A Bit More on the “Off Switch”

samadhi-buddha
It occurs to me that, what’s really happening when we hit the “Off Switch” on our minds, is that we are remembering the ever-presence of all-pervading saturation in meditative absorption.

When the spaghetti soup of thoughts is disengaged, what remains is bliss, joy and ecstasy.

Taking frequent breaks from the chain of thought throughout the day, reminds us that thoughts are empty… while the Life within us, experienced as jhana/samadhi (the ONLY thing in this world worthy of our attachment, according to the Buddha himself), is what living is truly all about.

Stepping aside from all that racket, we realize that perfect peace and ease is carried within us always, no matter how insane things seem to get on the outside.

Also, the more frequently we flip the “Off Switch,” the more often we remember to do so… until thoughts begin to give up on us, leaving us in silence.

The more we remember to cut the inflow of neurotic brain-chatter, the more we live in our true nature, which is filled with bliss, joy and ecstasy.

At a certain point, we realize that we don’t need all that vigilance, as Life has always got us covered. We are free to repose, free to float, free to be free.

This is what they mean by “beginner’s mind.”

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4 responses to “A Bit More on the “Off Switch”

  1. interesting that I receive this now, as I attempt to return to ‘beginner’s mind.’

  2. Good posting, Mike. The simplicity of the “Off Switch” concept is helpful to locate my (true) self in mid-course consciousness. Jeffrey Brooks’ scholarship at the hyperlink is powerful reinforcement.

  3. Yes, I agree with you Michael, if the second jhana is defined by the stilling of the mind, then “when we hit the “Off Switch” on our mind, we are remembering the ever-presence of all-pervading saturation in meditative absorption.” Most people, however, do not realize that “When the spaghetti soup of thoughts is disengaged, what remains is, bliss, joy and ecstasy.” And, conversely if the mind is engaged, then there is no bliss, joy and ecstasy. Do recall that ALL of the mystics defined their religious attainment in terms of bliss, joy and ecstasy, and liberation from neuroses. That neuroses is your obsessive mind.

    I also agree with Michael when he writes “Taking frequent breaks from the chain of thought throughout the day, reminds us that thoughts are empty,” and being without them is filled with bliss, joy and ecstasy, so life can be rich without the “spaghetti soup of thoughts.”

    However, when we begin to learn to use the “off-switch for the mind,” we often find that the mind will rebel. The more we try to still the mind, the more the mind fights back. We then find we are plagued by the mind, and there is no way to shut it off. We then try meditation technique, upon meditation technique trying to shut it off, but it won’t shut off. We then begin to wonder if it can be shut off. Whole religions were born upon the idea that the mind cannot be stilled, and the best we can do is just fill it up with repetitive prayer, which is called mantra. Or, we might go for endless visualizations, all of the time thinking, that there is some magic in the repetition. But, no, friends, meditation techniques are just giving a rubber toy to the mind to chew on, hoping that one day it will finally give up its incessant activity. So, friends, just find the off-switch and leave the mind off. That is all you have to do.

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